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Guitar Chord Dictionary

In this Guitar Chord Dictionary you will find basic guitar chord charts that will guide you to playing in no time.

Review the different guitar chords in the suggested order and remember to download the Printable Guitar Chords PDF document at the end of this lesson.




A chord is the sum of 3 or more pitches played at the same time. Every guitar chord can be played in a major, minor or 7th position. When the letter of the chord is followed by an "m" it means the chord is minor, when it is followed by a "7" the chord is dominant or seventh and when the letter is placed by itself it means the chord is major. View the explanation for basic guitar chord charts before scrolling down.

Free Guitar Chord Chart




Unlike reading tablatures, guitar chord charts are read with the strings in a vertical (from top to bottom) position and the frets in a horizontal (from left to right) position. Strings begin from left to right starting on the 6th and ending with the 1st; in the far right. When a number appears in the upper left-hand corner, it means that the chord should be played starting in that fret number. In this case, the top horizontal line refers to that fret number and not the nut. The little circle placed on top of the nut indicates than an open string be played.

Visit the guitar parts section if you are not familiarized with some of the terms mentioned in this site.

Here are the videos and basic guitar chord charts with the major, minor and 7th positions of each chord.


A CHORD:

B CHORD:

C CHORD:





D CHORD:

E CHORD:

F CHORD:

G CHORD:




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With these guitar song chords you are set to start playing over 90% of all songs you hear on the radio. Review the guitar chords carefully and practice changing from minor to mayor to 7th smoothly. At first your fingers might touch the nearby string, don't get frustrated; it's normal. Have patience and use the tip of your finger to press each string cleanly.

To find a more complex Guitar Chord Dictionary and their Guitar Chords Chart with augmented and diminished chords, visit Chordie. Another great option is All Guitar Chords - Chord finder, including split chords and chord variations. Also features standard and exotic guitar scales. In my opinion, they have the most complete chord dictionary on the internet.

If you haven't downloaded the printable guitar chords PDF document, do it now so you can practice later with the printed chord sheet offline. If the file opens in your browser select "FILE" then "SAVE PAGE AS".

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